People

Anne Kim

Anne Kim is a PPI senior fellow, senior writer at the Washington Monthly, and a fellow at the Aspen Institute Initiative on Financial Security.

Writings

Op-eds and Articles

By / 12.1.2017

In 2016, the 50 richest universities in America owned $331 billion in endowment wealth, a figure roughly three times the size of California’s entire state budget last year — and ten times the estimated net worth of President Donald Trump. Seventy-five percent of that wealth was held by less by four percent of schools, including such elite institutions as Harvard […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 10.24.2017

State-level Democratic leaders are showing how populism and pragmatism combined can energize liberal turnout while still winning crucial swing-state support. Under a clear blue sky in late summer, with the peaks of the Gallatin Mountains as a backdrop, Montana Governor Steve Bullock mingles with guests at a private event on a ranch just outside Bozeman. […]

Publications

By / 10.16.2017

A four-year degree is not the only path to middle-class security. High-quality occupational credentialing opportunities deserve equal standing and federal support. Many progressives believe “free college” to be the best way of helping more Americans achieve economic mobility and security. On average, workers with four-year degrees enjoy greater earnings and job security than high school […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 6.1.2015

PPI Senior Fellow Anne Kim wrote an opinion piece for The Washington Post comparing liberal versus moderate Democratic campaign spending. Her analysis shows in the past three election cycles, self-described moderate lawmakers spent roughly twice as much as their liberal counterparts to win or defend their seats. In 2014, moderates outspent their liberal colleagues by […]

Blog

By and / 6.17.2013

How much do congressional Republicans hate Obamacare? How determined are they to see it fail? We may soon find out. For the first time, a constituency group to whom the GOP normally pays close attention—religious institutions—is asking for a legislative “fix” of the Affordable Care Act to make it work as intended. If the recent […]

Blog

By / 6.14.2013

Fifty years after the passage of the Equal Pay Act, women are earning 77 cents on the dollar compared to men. While this gap is still bigger than it should be – especially since “breadwinner moms” now support 40 percent of American households – this disparity would unquestionably be worse without the cudgel of equal […]

Blog

By / 5.31.2013

At the end of 2012, the 112th Congress went down in history as the most unproductive ever. During 2011-2012, Congress passed a mere 283 laws – fewer than a third of the more than 900 laws passed by the “do-nothing Congress” derided by President Harry S Truman in 1948. The current Congress, however, is already […]

Blog

By / 5.24.2013

Since 2000, the nation’s poverty rate has been creeping inexorably upward, from a near-historic low of11.3 percent in 2000 to 15 percent in 2011. But in the suburbs, poverty has been exploding. According to a new book released this week by researchers Elizabeth Kneebone and Alan Berube of the Brookings Institution, suburban poverty has soared […]

Blog

By / 2.7.2013

New research by the firm HelloWallet finds that more than a quarter of Americans who have an employer-sponsored retirement plan are raiding these accounts for other uses. According to HelloWallet’s report, Americans are withdrawing more than $70 billion a year from their retirement savings—and often paying big penalties to do so. On top of regular […]

Blog

By and / 1.30.2013

In his second inaugural address, President Obama laid out a bold vision for solving economic inequality. “We are true to our creed,” he said, “when a little girl born into the bleakest poverty knows that she has the same chance to succeed as anybody else because she is an American.” The president has hinted at […]