People

Dane Stangler

Dane Stangler is research manager at the Kauffman Foundation.

Writings

Blog

By / 4.2.2012

The late economist Mancur Olson would have been a fan of Jonathan Ames. Ames is the creator of the HBO series Bored to Death as well as the eponymous protagonist, an aspiring novelist who moonlights as a private investigator. Olson may have enjoyed the ensuing hijinks, but he would have seen a larger economic lesson […]

Blog

By / 2.2.2012

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney has taken a beating over the past few weeks regarding his long tenure at the private equity firm, Bain Capital. After distinguishing himself from President Obama as someone who truly knows how to create jobs, Romney likely did not expect to have his business credentials challenged—let alone by his Republican […]

Blog

By / 9.12.2011

Last month, PPI released a provocative policy brief by Will Marshall, “Labor and the Producer Society,” which argued that the Great Recession and stalled economic recovery mean, “there can be no going back to the old economic model of debt-fueled consumption.” In this, Will is precisely correct. Even as median American income failed to rise […]

Blog

By / 7.13.2010

The recent Bloomberg BusinessWeek cover story by former Intel CEO Andy Grove, “How to Make an American Job,” has stimulated no shortage of reaction in the blogosphere. From the even-handed and the thoughtful, to the politely skeptical and the sharply critical, bloggers and commentators have weighed in on Grove’s essay. What precipitated this running debate […]

Blog

By / 4.30.2010

On the heels of a severe recession, with stubbornly high unemployment and a still-sputtering recovery, economists and policy-makers are casting around for something — anything — that might jump-start economic growth and rapid job creation. One place we might expect them to look for ideas is our own economic history: Where have new jobs come […]

Blog

By / 4.13.2010

A recent post highlighted the importance of new and young companies to job creation in the U.S., implicitly raising an important question for policy makers: How can we increase the number of startups? Assuming it can be done, such an increase would not solve all of the economic challenges facing this country, but it would […]

Blog

By / 4.8.2010

A distinct sense of unease permeates the traditional spirit of American optimism. The unemployment rate appears stuck at 9.7 percent, and many project that it will fall to around only eight percent by 2012 and to perhaps five percent by the middle of the decade. Disquiet over jobs is joined by a vague fear that […]