People / Staff

Emily Langhorne

Emily Langhorne is the Project Manager and Policy Analyst for Reinventing America’s School. A graduate of James Madison University, Emily earned a Master of Education from the George Washington University and a Master of Philosophy in Literature from Trinity College Dublin. Emily previously worked for Fairfax County Public Schools, teaching high school English and directing writing centers. She has also worked for George Washington University’s Upward Bound Program where she designed and implemented curricula to boost the literacy skills of urban youths. Emily won awards for her writing at both James Madison University and George Washington University.

Writings

Op-eds and Articles

By and / 3.15.2018

The bipartisan budget deal that Congress agreed to last month failed to solve the plight of the Dreamers and extends tax cuts that will add billions to the deficit. Still, quietly buried in the text of the law is much-needed good news for low-income mothers and their children: a provision reauthorizing federal support for home […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 3.13.2018

Three students stabbed in one week. That’s how 2018 began for New Rochelle High School in Westchester, New York. These school stabbings came just months after the highly publicized, fatal stabbing of a student at Urban Assembly School for Wildlife Conservation in the Bronx. As Americans try to understand the increase of violence in their […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 3.7.2018

Whenever we had lockdown drills, I’d get angry with my students. The lights were off, the door was locked, and students were seated silently under their desks. For about three minutes. Then, the whispers began. Muted laughter followed; Phone screens flashed as students texted their friends, taking advantage of this “break” from learning. After the […]

Blog

By / 2.21.2018

This week, Antwan Wilson stepped down as Chancellor of District of Columbia Public Schools after the majority of the 13-member D.C. City Council demanded his resignation for skirting the rules of the infamously competitive D.C. school lottery. Wilson ensured his daughter received a preferential transfer into the district’s highest-performing, non-selective traditional public school. To the […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 1.25.2018

In November, NPR uncovered a graduation scandal at Ballou High Schoolin Washington, D.C., where half the graduates missed more than 90 days of school. Administrators pressured teachers to pass failing students, including those whom teachers had barely seen. Policy wonks have had a field day with the report, adding graduation scandals to their lists of […]

Blog

By and / 1.24.2018

Fighting for the neediest and pushing back against special interests are often unexpected actions in the realm of political battles. However, Dorsey Hopson, Superintendent of the Shelby County Schools (SCS) in Memphis, Tennessee, might exceed our expectations. Last week, Hopson announced that he is “willing to voluntarily relinquish control over some struggling schools to be […]

Op-eds and Articles

By and / 1.8.2018

A recent New York Times article suggested that Chicago had the nation’s fastest-improving large urban school district. In it, reporters Emily Badger and Kevin Quealy summarized data from a new study by Sean Reardon of the Stanford University Center for Education Policy Analysis. For many, that was surprising news, since the district has received heat […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 12.21.2017

The Associated Press recently published an analysis that claims charter schools increase segregation in America’s public schools. Charter schools are public schools operated by independent organizations, usually nonprofits. Freed from many of the rules that constrain district-operated schools, they can craft programs that meet the needs of their students. In exchange for increased autonomy, they […]

Op-eds and Articles

By and / 11.29.2017

The Albert Shanker Institute recently released a report that analyzed the negative effects of private schools on integrated public education in Washington, D.C. While only 15 percent of students in the nation’s capital attend private schools, 57 percent of white students do. Private schools essentially create the segregation equivalent of white flight to the suburbs, […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 11.15.2017

When I was a teacher, I didn’t have a “cute” classroom. My colleague upstairs designed a reading space for students, complete with comfortable seats, a special carpet, and twinkle lights. I was lucky if my posters stayed on the wall (which, often they didn’t because of the school’s erratic temperature changes). Regardless, most students loved […]