People / Staff

Michael Mandel

Dr. Michael Mandel is chief economic strategist at the Progressive Policy Institute in Washington, where he supervises PPI’s research and policy work across a wide range of topics, including the data-driven economy, the impact of regulation on innovation, and policies to improve production, investment and job growth in the United States and globally. Mandel was co-principal investigator for a Sloan Foundation grant on “Measuring the Impact of Globalization.” Mandel has testified before Congress on impact of regulation on innovation.

Mandel also holds an appointment as senior fellow at Wharton’s Mack Institute for Innovation Management at the University of Pennsylvania, and serves as president and founder of South Mountain Economics LLC, which provides expertise on emerging occupations and emerging industries.  South Mountain Economics is best known for its research reports on the App Economy, which have been cited in a recent White House report, and publications such as the New York Times, Bloomberg, Boston Globe, the Financial Times, the Atlantic, Time, and Forbes.

Mandel received a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University and formerly served as chief economist at BusinessWeek, where he directed the magazine’s coverage of the domestic and global economies. While at BusinessWeek, Michael was named one of the top 100 business journalists of the 20th century for his writings on innovation and growth. He received multiple awards for his work, including the Gerald Loeb Award for Business and Financial Journalism.  He is the author of four books including Rational Exuberance: Silencing the Enemies of Growth and Why the Future Is Better Than You Think. He is currently revising the third edition of his introductory economics textbook, Economics:The Basics.

Writings

Publications

By and / 3.13.2018

In October 2017, Governor Jerry Brown of California signed a “drug price transparency bill,” requiring pharma and biotech companies to give advance notification of significant price increases and provide specific justifications. Brown hailed the bill as a big step toward holding down spending on health care. “Californians have a right to know why their medical […]

Blog

By / 3.12.2018

I’ve been arguing that the shift to ecommerce has improved the position of workers, by increasing the number of jobs and boosting wage payments. In a nice twitter discussion last week, Jose Azar pointed out that I had not specified a counterfactual, and he was right. So here I will make up for that omission, […]

Blog

By / 3.9.2018

There’s a lot of talk about labor monopsony these days.  But at least in ecommerce, the labor market seems to be working the old-fashioned way—booming demand for fulfillment center workers and package delivery workers is leading to sharply rising real wages. Over the past year, employment of production and nonsupervisory workers in the warehousing industry […]

Blog

By / 3.5.2018

PPI has repeatedly made the economic case that accelerating the deployment of 5G  is essential for boosting growth.   For example, in a 2016 report, we estimated that next generation wireless could add 0.7 percentage points annually to economic growth.* Moreover, as we noted in a January 2018 report, 5G networks can play a key role […]

Publications

By and / 3.1.2018

Healthcare faces three major issues: access, cost, and productivity. Telemedicine — the use of technology to help treat patients remotely – can help address all three. Broadband allows many underserved rural and minority communities that previously had limited access to medical services to remotely access high-quality medical care. Telemedicine reduces the need for expensive real […]

Other

Healthcare faces three major issues: access, cost, and productivity. Telemedicine — the use of technology to help treat patients remotely – can help address all three. Broadband allows many underserved rural and minority communities that previously had limited access to medical services to remotely access high-quality medical care. Telemedicine reduces the need for expensive real […]

Blog

In 2017,  the ten largest tech/telecom companies by market cap employed 1.6 million workers, based on their latest financial reports.* That’s up 82% from ten years earlier. By contrast, the ten largest industrial companies in 1979, measured by market cap, employed 2.2 million workers  (1979 was the peak year for manufacturing employment in the US). […]

Blog

By / 2.20.2018

Distressingly, the labor share of income in the US has been on a long -term downward trend. Indeed, the labor share  is lower now than it was in 2006, before the last recession. Recent research has proposed that the labor share has fallen, in part, because market power has been increasing across the US economy. […]

Blog

By / 2.16.2018

Overall, 2017 was still a weak year for wage growth. In the private sector, real hourly wages for production and nonsupervisory workers rose only 0.2% in 2017, the slowest rate since 2012. However, production and nonsupervisory workers did do significantly better in some industries. The table below lists the top 2017 increases in real hourly […]

Blog

By / 2.13.2018

In light of the FTC confirmation hearings tomorrow, we’ve been thinking about competition policy. We would like to propose a different approach to competition policy, one that goes far beyond Chicago-style antitrust analysis. There’s little doubt that recent research has conclusively demonstrated increased concentration across almost every sector of the US economy over the past […]