Issues

By / 9.21.2017

Debate has erupted in the past week and a half over Allergan’s surprise move to transfer all of its intellectual property rights to its blockbuster drug Restasis to the Saint Regis Mohawk Indian Tribe.  Allergan’s CEO Brent Saunders said he sold Allergan’s intellectual property rights in Restatis to protect it from the “double jeopardy” of […]

By / 9.21.2017

The pharmaceutical company Allergan shocked the prescription drug market this month when it transferred its intellectual property rights to its blockbuster drug Restasis, a treatment for dry eyes that generated $1.5 billion in sales last year, to the Saint Regis Mohawk Indian Tribe in exchange for an exclusive licensing deal. This bold tactic was intended […]

By / 9.18.2017

Phil Goldberg and Kathryn Constance discuss the impact that a recent Supreme Court decision could have on sanctions over discovery and other litigation disputes. The U.S. Supreme Court, in the little-known case Goodyear v. Haeger this past term, set important limits on a judge’s inherent authority sanctions, which could have significant implications in discovery disputes. […]

By / 9.14.2017

Even as Congress passed $15 billion in initial funding for Hurricane Harvey relief, Americans were glued to their TVs watching Hurricane Irma, the strongest-ever Atlantic storm, bear down on Florida, where millions are still without power and other services. Sadly, Congress, and the rest of us, had better get used to it. Harvey and Irma […]

By / 9.8.2017

On Sept. 8, 1992, the first charter school opened, in St. Paul, Minn. Twenty-five years later, some 7,000 of these schools serve about three million students around the U.S. Their growth has become controversial among those wedded to the status quo, but charters undeniably are effective, especially in urban areas. After four years in a […]

By / 9.7.2017

On this week’s podcast, special guest David Osborne joins Mike Petrilli and Alyssa Schwenk to discuss his new book, Reinventing America’s Schools. During the Research Minute, Amber Northern examines a blockbuster study finding that the over-identification of minority children in special education is a myth. Listen here.

By / 9.6.2017

For almost two decades, education reform has been a source of conflict in the City of Brotherly Love. Much progress has been made, but too much energy is still devoted to fruitless district vs. charter debates. Those invested in such debates should take a look at the nation’s fastest-improving big cities, to see what can […]

By / 9.6.2017

Clean-energy policies championed by Democrats over the last decade have helped create millions of high-paying energy jobs for American workers. And innovative Democratic policies going forward can help spur millions more good jobs — in energy efficiency, natural gas, nuclear energy, carbon capture, wind, solar, electric vehicles and infrastructure — in coming years. This record […]

By / 9.5.2017

The last retail revolution, the rise of the big box store, was not a good thing for the typical sales clerk or cashier. “Warehouse clubs” and “supercenters” started popping up everywhere in the late 1980s. Retail productivity as measured by the government doubled from 1987 to 2007, as this new retail format was more efficient […]

By / 9.5.2017

If we were creating school systems from scratch, would we teach the same way we did 50 years ago, before the advent of personal computers? Would we send children to school for only eight-and-a-half months a year? Would we let schools survive if, year after year, a third of their students dropped out? Would we […]