Issues

By Will Marshall / 8.29.2016

Twenty years ago this month, President Bill Clinton signed a landmark bill fulfilling his pledge to “end welfare as we know it.” It was the biggest change Clinton made in national policy, and it lanced a political boil that had vexed Americans for a generation. Both accomplishments, substantive and political, are worth celebrating today as […]

By Phil Goldberg / 8.26.2016

This summer, during one of the least productive sessions in recent history, a rare bipartisan achievement slipped through Congress under the political radar. Democrats and Republicans came together with environmentalists and chemical manufacturers to reform the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). So, what was the secret to TSCA’s success? All of these groups were unified […]

By David Osborne / 8.25.2016

By David Osborne and Anne Osborne Critics of charter schools love to charge that charters “cream” the best students by making it hard to apply and pushing out low performers. That’s why charters outperform traditional public schools, they assert. But they rarely present evidence, and they never admit that traditional public schools do exactly the […]

By Michael Mandel and Michelle Di Ionno / 8.25.2016

All around the world we are seeing the rise of the App Economy—jobs, companies, and economic growth created by the production and distribution of mobile applications (“apps”) that run on smartphones. Since the introduction of the iPhone in 2007, the App Economy has grown from nothing to a powerful economic force that rivals existing industries. […]

By Michael Mandel / 8.24.2016

Which countries should have the right to tax the profits of US-based multinationals that operate globally? A year ago we pointed out that this seemingly arcane question had the potential to become a major point of conflict between the US and the EU. Back then we warned of the potential for an “enormous job-and-revenue grab […]

By Michael Mandel / 8.11.2016

As we’ve repeatedly said, innovation creates jobs, not destroys them. But we’ve also recently pointed out that government has been lagging private sector spending on R&D, and that’s one reason why productivity growth and job creation has been weak. Moreover, PPI’s Will Marshall recently wrote that the Democrats have to resolve their economic identity crisis. So […]

By Will Marshall / 8.11.2016

Donald Trump’s travesty of a presidential campaign is forcing Republicans to ask themselves some hard questions: Does party loyalty outweigh the risks of putting a self-infatuated political ignoramus in the White House? Do they hate Hillary Clinton more than they love their country? No doubt Democrats are enjoying the GOP’s agonizing moment of truth, but […]

By Michael Mandel / 8.9.2016

PPI was among the first organizations to highlight the business investment drought, starting in 2010 and 2011, way before it became commonly accepted  (see here and here). And our “Investment Heroes” annual ranking was started in 2012 precisely to contrast the companies that were investing heavily in the United States with the many others that chose to pare back. […]

By David Osborne / 8.9.2016

By David Osborne and Richard Whitmire The list of failed school reforms launched since 1983’s A Nation at Risk is embarrassingly long. Worse yet, these sputtering reforms appear to be stacking up at a faster rate: Common Core, evaluating teachers partly on student test scores, luring top teachers into low-performing schools. Nothing seems to work out, with […]

By Michael Mandel / 8.8.2016

Yes, the productivity slump has hit the iron and steel mill industry as well. Robert Samuelson wrote a long piece in the WaPo about productivity growth in the steel industry, arguing that “…[p]roductivity (a.k.a., efficiency) has increased dramatically.” His main source was a very careful academic study by Allan Collard-Wexler of Duke University and Jan De Loecker of Princeton University. […]