A New Bargain for Upward Mobility

PPI’s Domestic and Social Policy Project seeks to develop a new framework aimed at helping ordinary Americans get ahead in a rapidly changing digital economy.

Our goal is to promote policies that:

  • Connect workers with real jobs at good wages and opportunities for advancement;
  • Equip workers throughout their careers with the skills they need and that businesses want;
  • Unleash Americans’ entrepreneurial potential and help rebuild the economy’s dynamism;
  • Foster a new social bargain that provides workers robust tools for financial security and employers with the flexibility to stay competitive; and
  • Demand stronger corporate stewardship of workers’ welfare, including greater responsibility for improving wages and benefits, helping workers upskill, providing flexible work arrangements and protecting worker voice.

American households rightly worry about the precarious state of their finances and their place in an economy beset by automation and other disruptive forces. By advancing a new vision for government that’s nimble, modernized and tech-savvy, and that that helps Americans achieve their aspirations rather than stand in their way, we can ensure that more workers share in the nation’s current and future prosperity.

Publications

By / 5.4.2018

A federal jobs guarantee is too expensive and too impractical to pass muster with the public.

By / 1.23.2018

Corporate tax cuts have long been on the wish list of American businesses, which have rightly argued that both the rates and structure of the U.S. corporate tax code hurt America’s ability to compete globally. U.S. companies are now on track to see dramatic reductions in their tax rates, thanks to the $1.5 trillion tax […]

By / 11.30.2017

For many Americans, self-employment and running  a small business can be an important pathway to the middle class, yet accessing credit to start or grow a business is more difficult, and potentially even more dangerous, than most realize. While banks have historically provided the majority of small business credit in the United States, and still […]

Press

By / 6.11.2018

I write this article as a freelancer. I take Lyft to get around. I’ve booked an apartment this summer through Airbnb. I’ve been an adjunct professor. I’ve just gotten estimates for roof and other home repairs from men who work for themselves. All of these activities are part of a large universe of what’s come […]

By / 6.7.2018

Lynnel Beauchesne’s dental office hugs a rural crossroads near Tunnelton, W.Va., population 336. Acres of empty farmland surround the weathered one-story white building; a couple of houses and a few barns are the only neighbors. But the parking lot is full. Some people have driven hours to see Beauchesne, the sole dentist within 30 miles. […]

By / 4.10.2018

It’s not surprising that at a time when it’s hard to trust Facebook, the president and Congress that truths we once found self-evident have given way to disbelief. Many Americans have discarded once taken-for-granted beliefs in democracy, science, God, hard work, reputable information, patriotism, marriage and good manners. Some of these currents cross class, age […]

Blog

By / 12.26.2017

We often hear how “precious” a child is, what a “treasure” she is, and how our kids are “our greatest resource.” Neuroscientists tell us that ages 0-3 are the most critical years for cognitive, social and moral development. Economists and business leaders tell us that early childhood education offers one of the best lifetime returns […]

By / 1.20.2017

In his inaugural address today, President Donald Trump said, “But for too many of our citizens, a different reality exists: Mothers and children trapped in poverty in our inner cities… We will get our people off of welfare and back to work.” President Trump thus implied that most U.S. poverty is in “inner cities” and […]

By / 1.10.2017

All low-income Americans should be equipped with an Online HOPE (Health, Opportunity, and Personal Empowerment) account. .S. poverty policy is stuck in a rut. In 2015, 43 million people in America were living in poverty – more than the combined populations of Texas, Pennsylvania, and Nebraska and 11 million more than in 2000. Slow growth […]