Reinventing America’s Schools

America needs a 21st century model of public education geared to the knowledge economy. Charter schools are showing the way, because they provide autonomy for schools, accountability for results, and parental choice among schools tailored to the diverse learning styles of children. David Osborne’s book, Reinventing America’s Schools, explores the new paradigm of public education that is emerging to fit the realities of the 21st century.

Publications

By and / 7.18.2017

Last week, the National Education Association (NEA) voted to adopt a new policy statement[1] on public charter schools. Ignoring mounting evidence that the best charter systems are finally giving urban children a shot at a decent education, the NEA calls for a moratorium on the creation and expansion of public charter schools. The NEA says […]

By / 1.12.2017

Springfield, Massachusetts, is where the United States’ one wholly indigenous sport – basketball – was invented. It may soon be known for a completely different innovation. The Springfield Empowerment Zone Partnership (SEZP) is an attempt to create within the public schools the conditions that make charter schools successful, without the poisonous politics that often accompany […]

By / 12.15.2016

Our urban school systems struggle because so many of their students live in poverty, but they also struggle because they were designed a hundred years ago, for an industrial society. In an increasing number of cities, they are being replaced by 21st century systems, in which the central administration does not operate all schools and […]

Press

By and / 11.29.2017

The Albert Shanker Institute recently released a report that analyzed the negative effects of private schools on integrated public education in Washington, D.C. While only 15 percent of students in the nation’s capital attend private schools, 57 percent of white students do. Private schools essentially create the segregation equivalent of white flight to the suburbs, […]

By / 11.15.2017

When I was a teacher, I didn’t have a “cute” classroom. My colleague upstairs designed a reading space for students, complete with comfortable seats, a special carpet, and twinkle lights. I was lucky if my posters stayed on the wall (which, often they didn’t because of the school’s erratic temperature changes). Regardless, most students loved […]

By / 11.12.2017

When my son, now in college, started school in Maryland, he went to a private preschool, and only half-day public kindergarten existed. As for most young children in the United States, then and now, public early childhood education was unavailable. Full-day kindergarten is now the norm, and 35 percent of Maryland’s 4 year olds are […]

Blog

By / 10.19.2017

Free credentials would help millions of Americans without four-year degrees reach the middle-class debt free & close labor force “skills gap” WASHINGTON —The Progressive Policy Institute (PPI) today released a new policy report by senior fellow Anne Kim, “Forget ‘free college.’ How about ‘free credentials?,’” proposing greater federal support of high-quality occupational credentialing opportunities as […]

By and / 8.31.2017

In a recent media release, Indianapolis Public Schools (IPS) announced they are looking for “quality partners” to launch innovation network schools for the 2018-2019 school year. IPS explains their innovation school network as a group of “public schools with expanded autonomy to make academic and operational decisions that will maximize student achievement. Innovation schools also […]

By / 8.4.2017

When I was a kid, my parents bought a house in a middle class neighborhood of an economically diverse city. My brother, who is a year older than me, embarked upon his schooling in our local public elementary school – an adventure that lasted one year. His teacher struggled to control the class, fights broke […]