Publications / Regulatory Reform

Publications

Policy Brief

By / 5.27.2014

Since the agreement between Comcast and Netflix was struck in February 2014, several parties have called on the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to regulate dealings between networks that comprise the Internet generally, and to dictate the terms of interconnection by Internet service providers (ISPs) in particular. This Policy Brief considers the costs and benefits to […]

Policy Brief

By / 10.1.2013

President Obama brought much needed attention this June to “patent trolling,” a growing area of litigation abuse vexing America’s high-tech industries. In these lawsuits, shell businesses called Patent Assertion Entities (PAEs) or Non-Practicing Entities (NPEs)—some of which have been nicknamed “patent trolls”—game the patent and litigation systems. They purchase dormant patents, wait for others to independently […]

Policy Report

By / 7.18.2013

The broadband Internet is an epochal technology. It is transforming the economy and changing the nature of everyday life. Its construction and development requires large quantities of resources, and its existence generates substantial innovation and economic growth. What is the public sector’s best policy approach to this burgeoning phenomenon? Views differ across the political spectrum. […]

Policy Memo

By and / 5.9.2013

The natural accumulation of federal regulations over time imposes an unintended but significant cost to businesses and to economic growth. However, no effective process currently exists for retrospectively improving or removing regulations. This paper first puts forward three explanations for how regulatory accumulation itself imposes an economic burden, and how this burden has historically been […]

Policy Memo

On October 10-12, 2012, the Progressive Policy Institute joined forces with John Cabot University in Rome to highlight the transformative potential of rise of data-driven economic innovation and growth. Hosted by John Cabot in collaboration with the Guarini Institute, the European Privacy Association and the Center for European Policy Studies, the transatlantic dialogue brought together […]

Policy Brief

By and / 7.11.2012

American voters are finding it hard to get excited about this year’s presidential election. Job growth is slow. Economic growth is slow. Real wages have been essentially stagnant since 2009. It’s the same old story as when recovery began three years ago. We are in an atmosphere of economic uncertainty. Voters—swing voters especially—are looking for […]

Policy Memo

By / 4.2.2012

The late economist Mancur Olson would have been a fan of Jonathan Ames. Ames is the creator of the HBO series Bored to Death as well as the eponymous protagonist, an aspiring novelist who moonlights as a private investigator. Olson may have enjoyed the ensuing hijinks, but he would have seen a larger economic lesson […]

Policy Brief

By and / 3.22.2012

Advances in drilling and recovery technologies for shale gas have reshaped our assumptions about America’s natural gas resources and our future energy options. Expanded development of shale gas and its associated liquids offer the potential for turning energy scarcity into plenty, fostering a renaissance in our petrochemical and manufacturing sectors, and offering a cleaner option […]

Policy Memo

By / 12.13.2011

Can government policy encourage technology innovation in the short run? Probably not—while the government does have plenty of long-term levers, such as spending on basic research and investment in science and engineering education, there are few ways to speed up innovation over the next year. Rather, government policy is actually quite capable of discouraging innovation […]

Policy Brief

By / 12.13.2011

In 2004, Google made headlines by “going public,” raising $1.7 billion in what was then the biggest initial stock offering since the heady days of the tech boom.