People / Staff

Arielle Kane

Arielle Kane is the director of health care at PPI. Her research focuses on what comes next for health policy in order to expand access, reduce costs and improve quality. Specifically, she focusses on how innovation in health care can help meet the goals of the triple aim. Prior to joining PPI, she worked at the Deloitte Center for Health Solutions where she researched provider issues, including conducting a survey of health system CEOs on the future of health care; policy issues, including analysis of the recent tax overhaul; and managed a weekly newsletter which provided updates and analysis on health policy and industry news. Arielle also worked in Oregon politics prior to moving to Washington, DC. Arielle received her Master of Public Policy from Georgetown University. She lives in Washington, DC with her bulldog, Hank.

Writings

Publications

By / 10.3.2018

Carl Icahn, the billionaire businessman and investor, recently advised shareholders to reject Cigna’s proposed $67 billion acquisition of the pharmacy benefit manager (PBM) Express Scripts. He says that a reckoning is coming for PBMs and that the price grossly exaggerated their value as “over-earning middle men.” In 2016, PBMs made $23 billion in gross profits […]

Blog

By / 8.28.2018

The drug industry, like any industry, has its share of bad actors. The loathsome Martin Shkreli is now serving time after his company, Turing Pharmaceuticals, jacked up the cost of a lifesaving AIDS drug by 5,000 percent. Mylan, a Dutch company, was caught overcharging the federal Medicaid program $1.27 billion for EpiPens, used to protect […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 8.8.2018

Last week, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced that it had approved a reinsurance proposal in Wisconsin and Maine in an effort to keep health premiums down. Reinsurance is essentially insurance for insurers: The government helps pay for the cost of exceptionally high-cost claims. It’s no wonder states have been working on […]

Blog

By / 8.3.2018

President Trump promised Americans cheaper and better health care than what is provided under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Yet his latest move, to expand access to short-term, limited-duration health plans, may make insurance cheaper but far from better. These short-term plans have existed under the ACA as a short-term stop-gap measure for people in […]

Publications

By / 7.19.2018

Americans who buy health insurance on the exchanges set up by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) are having sticker shock as preliminary rates are filed for the 2019 plan year. Healthcare analysts expect insurance premiums to skyrocket during the next open enrollment period, which inconveniently begins just before the 2018 midterm elections. These higher premiums […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 7.11.2018

President Trump’s nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to fill the seat on the Supreme Court vacated by Justice Anthony Kennedy have left many to wonder: What will replacing an often swing vote with a more conservative one mean for health care? There are many pending cases in lower courts that, if they make it a […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 6.20.2018

Two weeks ago, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) filed a legal brief in support of a Texas lawsuit that would kill one of the most popular provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA): the one that ensures people with past medical problems can get affordable health insurance. It’s the latest twist in the Trump administration’s unrelenting […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 5.8.2018

In the future, medicine will be tailored to your individual “genome” or genetic code, lifestyle and community. Rather than a one-size-fits-most treatment, doctors will use data to determine what therapies you should receive based on genetic traits you’ve inherited from family, your daily habits, and where you live. But how do we get there? We […]

Publications

By and / 4.25.2018

Federal policy should move beyond fee-for-service and prioritize prevention Nearly half a million Americans suffering from kidney failure depend for their survival on dialysis. For many of them, life is nasty, brutish, and short. One in four dialysis patients will die within the first year of treatment, and six in 10 will die within five years. Patients […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 3.22.2018

Under Gov. Gina Raimondo, Rhode Island is aiming to rebuild its economy — once factory-based — around advanced industries​​ such as biotech and software. With such projects as the Providence Innovation & Design District, the goal is to create good-paying jobs by attracting leading-edge companies to the state. How odd, then, that the state legislature […]