People / Staff

Anne Kim

Anne Kim is a Vice President of Domestic Policy at The Progressive Policy Institute (PPI). She has written extensively on a wide range of issues in economic and social policy, with a particular emphasis on economic mobility, poverty, middle class opportunity and the intersection of policy and politics. Prior to her current role at PPI, Anne was Senior Writer at the nonprofit public policy magazine Washington Monthly, where she remains a contributing editor. She was also Director of the Economic Program at the think tank Third Way and founded and directed the organization’s Social Policy and Politics Program. Anne has also worked as legislative director and deputy chief of staff to Rep. Jim Cooper (D-TN) and as Senior Policy Strategist at Prosperity Now (formerly the Corporation for Enterprise Development). She also spent six years in private practice as a corporate transactions lawyer before turning to public policy. Anne’s writings have appeared in a variety of publications, including the Washington Monthly, Atlantic.com, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, Politico, The American Interest, Democracy, and The Hill. She has also appeared on C-SPAN, CNBC, CNN and Fox and is currently working on a book on youth policy to be published by the New Press. In addition to her work at PPI, Anne is also a Senior Fellow for the Aspen Institute’s Initiative on Financial Security and Editorial Advisor to TradeVistas, a project of the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Anne has a bachelor’s in journalism from the University of Missouri-Columbia and a law degree from Duke University.

Writings

Publications

By / 2.26.2019

As many as 41 million Americans live in “higher education deserts” – at least half an hour’s drive from the nearest college or university and with limited access to community college. Many of these deserts are in rural America, which is one reason so much of rural America is less prosperous than it deserves to […]

Publications

By / 1.29.2019

As many as 4.4 million U.S. jobs are going unfilled due to shortages of workers with the right skills. Many of these opportunities are in so-called “middle-skill” occupations, such as IT or advanced manufacturing, where workers need some sort of post-secondary credential but not a four-year degree. Expanding access to high-quality career education and training […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 1.7.2019

Doing good pays dividends for both corporations and governments. Just ask Philadelphia. Azavea is a 65-person software development company based in Philadelphia. Its business is helping governments and nonprofits use geospatial data to achieve various public goals, such as improving traffic flow or reducing pollution. Many would call Azavea a dream employer. It shares its […]

Op-eds and Articles

By and / 12.14.2018

Emboldened by their new majority in the House of Representatives, Democrats are understandably eager to exercise their power. Some House members believe the way to do that is with an aggressive, sharply partisan agenda aimed at both calling out President Trump for his egregious behavior and demanding immediate action on longshot legislation such as single-payer […]

Op-eds and Articles

By and / 11.26.2018

For years, partisans and ideologues have assured us that the political center is dead, so don’t bother making persuasive arguments to swing voters. Just get your base out, and may the most “energized” team win. The 2018 midterm elections, however, showed that the center’s demise has been greatly exaggerated. The big story was the revolt […]

Publications

By and / 11.14.2018

The Progressive Policy Institute (PPI) today released a national opinion survey that highlights the surprising resilience of America’s pragmatic political center two years into Donald Trump’s deeply polarizing presidency. The poll reinforces a key takeaway from the 2018 midterm elections: Suburban voters – especially women – are repelled by the president’s racial and cultural demagoguery […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 10.30.2018

The new federal program could lure fresh investment to distressed areas. But the clock is ticking. Twenty years ago, the rural hamlet of South Boston, Va., was a thriving blue-collar, middle-class community. Most of its residents were employed in manufacturing, such as at the nearby Burlington Industries textile plant and Russell Stover candy factory, or […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 10.16.2018

Democratic primary voters didn’t buy the ultra-left’s ‘free-for-all’ agenda. What’s happening is not so much a liberal surge, but a moderate one. Candidates affiliated with the Democratic Socialists and the progressive left have pushed hard this cycle for a campaign agenda heavy on government giveaways, such as free health care (“Medicare for All”), free college, […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 8.28.2018

They’re a tempting alternative to raising taxes, but their long-term costs far outweigh the revenue they bring in. Raising taxes is painful. That may be why, since 2010, 47 states and a number of cities have instead raised both civil and criminal fines and fees. These increases are often viewed as a conflict-free way to […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 8.27.2018

Geography is a barrier to higher education for tens of millions of rural Americans. A few states have hit on an innovative solution. fter graduating from her rural Pennsylvania high school in 2005, Tesla Rae Moore did what many, perhaps most American high school seniors today expect to do: she left home for college with […]