People / Staff

Emily Langhorne

Emily Langhorne is the Project Manager and Policy Analyst for Reinventing America’s School. A graduate of James Madison University, Emily earned a Master of Education from the George Washington University and a Master of Philosophy in Literature from Trinity College Dublin. Emily previously worked for Fairfax County Public Schools, teaching high school English and directing writing centers. She has also worked for George Washington University’s Upward Bound Program where she designed and implemented curricula to boost the literacy skills of urban youths. Emily won awards for her writing at both James Madison University and George Washington University.

Writings

Op-eds and Articles

By / 6.18.2018

For the past six months, scandal after scandal has come to light in the nation’s capital as the media’s interrogation lamps have shone on D.C. Public Schools. In November, WAMU exposed a graduation scandal at Ballou High School, leading the Office of the State Superintendent to launch an investigation into DCPS.  The investigation revealed district-wide […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 6.8.2018

In many cities across the nation, home values and rents have risen so high they are pricing teachers out of the market. Young teachers either spend the majority of their paychecks on rent, deal with long daily commutes, or leave the profession. In a survey of public school teachers who left the profession in 2012, two […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 6.5.2018

When asked about my education in a traditional public high school, I always talk about Mr. Gebler’s pre-calculus class. I remember it well for two reasons. One, I struggled to earn a C. Two, his standards — like his eccentric behavior and dedication to students — were so exceptional that I actually retained the content […]

Blog

By / 5.9.2018

This morning, U.S. News and World Report released its 2018 list of the nation’s best high schools. For the past few years, public charters have been slowly taking over the top 10 spots on the list; this year, they dominated them. For those of us who believe in the power of public school choice to bring […]

Op-eds and Articles

By and / 4.17.2018

The latest edition of the Nation’s Report Card — the 2017 National Assessment of Educational Progress — got a lot of ink last week. While results nationally were a yawn, the scores from Washington, D.C., hold powerful lessons for other cities. Together, D.C. charter and district public schools have improved faster than those of any […]

Op-eds and Articles

By and / 4.13.2018

In public education, the nation’s fastest-improving cities have embraced both charter schools and charter-like “innovation” or “renaissance” schools: public schools with real autonomy (some run by nonprofit organizations), real accountability for performance (including closure if their students are falling too far behind), and a variety of learning models from which families can choose. Those rapidly […]

Op-eds and Articles

By and / 3.15.2018

The bipartisan budget deal that Congress agreed to last month failed to solve the plight of the Dreamers and extends tax cuts that will add billions to the deficit. Still, quietly buried in the text of the law is much-needed good news for low-income mothers and their children: a provision reauthorizing federal support for home […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 3.13.2018

Three students stabbed in one week. That’s how 2018 began for New Rochelle High School in Westchester, New York. These school stabbings came just months after the highly publicized, fatal stabbing of a student at Urban Assembly School for Wildlife Conservation in the Bronx. As Americans try to understand the increase of violence in their […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 3.7.2018

Whenever we had lockdown drills, I’d get angry with my students. The lights were off, the door was locked, and students were seated silently under their desks. For about three minutes. Then, the whispers began. Muted laughter followed; Phone screens flashed as students texted their friends, taking advantage of this “break” from learning. After the […]

Blog

By / 2.21.2018

This week, Antwan Wilson stepped down as Chancellor of District of Columbia Public Schools after the majority of the 13-member D.C. City Council demanded his resignation for skirting the rules of the infamously competitive D.C. school lottery. Wilson ensured his daughter received a preferential transfer into the district’s highest-performing, non-selective traditional public school. To the […]