People / Staff

Elliott Long

Elliott Long is a Senior Economic Policy Analyst for the Progressive Policy Institute. Before coming to PPI, Elliott served as Small Business Majority’s Policy & Development Associate. He has also interned for members of Congress and at the White House Office of Legislative Affairs. Elliott holds a BA in Political Science from Florida Gulf Coast University and MPA from George Washington University.

Writings

Publications

By and / 9.12.2019

India is one of the premier technology countries in the world. According to one forecast, India will overtake the US as the world’s largest developer population center by 2024. (1) India is also one of the leading countries for mobile app downloads, due to its more than 500 million smartphone users. (2) At the same […]

Other

By / 8.2.2019

The Canadian App Economy is strong both in terms of app exports and compared to its industrialized peers. The Canadian App Economy has 262,000 App Economy workers as of November 2018, according to a recently released report by the Progressive Policy Institute (PPI). App Economy workers are those that develop, maintain, or support mobile applications. […]

Blog

By and / 7.16.2019

The U.S. economy recently marked 10 years of economic expansion – its longest in history – but there’s an important exception: new business creation. In recent decades, the American entrepreneurial engine has decelerated. Regulatory reform could help revive American entrepreneurship, reducing the burden on new businesses and realizing gains in economic growth. That doesn’t necessarily […]

Other

By and / 6.19.2019

We are seeing two important, and in some ways, potentially contradictory trends in manufacturing these days. On the one hand, there are signs of a transformation and rebirth in domestic manufacturing. Technological innovations such as 3D printing and robotics are lowering the cost of manufacturing at home, while global trade tensions are leading companies to […]

Other

By / 5.6.2019

Republicans despise federal micromanagement, but that hasn’t kept Rep. Don Young of Alaska from hopping aboard the Washington-Knows-Best Express. He recently introduced a bill mandating that freight trains have a minimum of two crew members on board trains at all times. While Young justifies his bill on safety grounds, the bill also appears to reflect […]

Blog

By / 4.30.2019

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) should be complimented for following a data-based approach to innovation and clearing the sale of heat sticks. These are new electrically heated tobacco systems that slowly heat tobacco, rather than burning it, with much fewer harmful chemical byproducts. The agency took almost two years to rigorously analyze the health […]

Other

By and / 4.8.2019

La version française est ci-dessous. The global App Economy started in 2007, when Apple introduced the first iPhone. Apple’s opening of the App Store in 2008 – followed by Android Market (later renamed Google Play), Blackberry App World (later renamed Blackberry World) and other app stores – created a way for developers to write mobile applications […]

Other

By and / 4.7.2019

Apple introduced the first iPhone in 2007 just as the Global Recession was about to begin. While central bankers and national leaders struggled with a deep financial crisis and stagnation, the fervent demand for iPhones and the wave of smartphones that followed provided a rare force for growth. The smartphone also triggered a new era […]

Publications

By / 3.5.2019

Regulation plays a critical role in refereeing competition in a free market economy. But there’s a problem: Each year, Congress piles new rules upon old, creating a thick sludge of regulations – some obsolete, repetitive, and even contradictory – that weighs down citizens and businesses. In 2017, the Code of Federal Regulations swelled to a […]

Publications

By and / 2.12.2019

Starting a new business is hard. Scaling it up to a significant size is harder. Europeans have long fretted about their lack of ‘unicorns’— privately held startups with a valuation of more than $1 billion. More generally, there is a sense that European startups either fail to grow or are bought out by larger companies […]