People / Staff

Paul Weinstein Jr.

Paul Weinstein Jr. is a PPI senior fellow and from 2005 to 2009 served as the organization’s chief operating officer. Weinstein is currently the Director of the MA in Public Management program at Johns Hopkins University and a consultant to the Promontory Interfinancial Network, a leading fintech firm. A veteran of two Presidential Administrations, he was senior advisor to the National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform (Simpson-Bowles), which was created by President Obama to address the nation’s mid- and long-term fiscal challenges. Weinstein formerly served as Special Assistant to the President and chief of staff of the White House Domestic Policy Council, and then later as senior advisor for policy planning to the Vice President during the Clinton-Gore Administration. Mr. Weinstein has taught at The Johns Hopkins University since 2003, and has also lectured at Columbia University and Georgetown University. He is co-author of the textbook, The Art of Policy Making (now in its second edition). His writing also has appeared in The Boston Globe, The Baltimore Sun, New York Newsday, Forbes, Investors Business Daily, and Politico among others. Before joining the Clinton administration, Weinstein served as a legislative aide to former Representative C. Thomas McMillen (D-MD) and then-Senator Albert Gore Jr. (D-TN).

Writings

Publications

By and / 10.31.2019

Americans are drowning in debt, both privately and collectively. Last summer, the national debt topped $22 trillion. On the private side, total U.S. household debt hit $13.6 trillion in 2019 – driven by higher student loan, credit card, mortgage, and auto loan debt. 

Blog

By / 10.15.2019

IRS Free File and VITA programs should be improved not discarded. According to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), 90 percent of taxpayers hire paid tax preparers or utilize tax preparation software to file their taxes. For low-income families the cost of tax preparation can significantly reduce the value of their refunds. A 2016 study by […]

Publications

By / 5.14.2019

If you think your credit report is accurate, there is a good chance you are wrong. According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), one in five Americans has a potentially material error in their credit file, and one of the biggest contributors is medical bills—with half of all medical bills containing an error. In fact, […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 10.17.2018

Once upon a time in Washington, D.C., a compulsive liar was in charge of the local government, the city’s legislature was beyond dysfunctional, and the District had debt as far as the eye could see. Today, a similar situation has returned to Washington, but this time it is the federal government, not the D.C. government, […]

Publications

By / 5.10.2018

Despite all the attention it has received in recent years, the cost of college continues to rise at both private and public institutions across the United States. According to data from the College Board, average tuition and fees for a public four-year college is $20,770 if in-state or $35,420 for out-of-state, and $46,950 for private, […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 12.8.2017

Why is the decision to promote competition in the credit scoring model industry complicated? At first blush it would seem to make perfect sense. More competition could lead to lower costs for those who use the scores. Furthermore, it might increase the likelihood that some qualified individuals — who may not be approved for a […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 8.10.2017

The curtain is about to come down on Paul Ryan’s run as a major force in Washington politics. Should Democrats gain control of the House of Representatives next year Ryan would lose his speakership (and he would likely be forced to step down as Republican leader as well). If Republicans hold onto the House by […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 5.23.2017

When Congress passed the Dodd-Frank Act, it included a requirement that U.S. companies annually report the ratio between their CEO and median worker pay. This modest provision takes effect this year, but it’s unlikely to reverse America’s widening pay gap.​ In fact, if President Trump has his way on tax reform, the earnings gap will […]

Publications

By / 3.21.2017

While much of the debate over the first few months of the Trump Presidency has focused on immigration, cabinet nominations, and Russian interference in the U.S. election, the push toward corporate tax reform may be building momentum. With a growing number of President Trump’s inner circle embracing Speaker Paul Ryan’s proposed Border Adjusted Destination-Based Cash […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 11.2.2016

POLICIES FOR THE NEXT ADMINISTRATION. PART 8: FEDERAL BUDGET This is the eighth in a series on the major policy ideas — from Left and Right — that should guide the next presidential administration’s agenda. (For the opposing view, see James C. Capretta, “Fiscal Policy After the Election.“) Hillary Clinton’s agenda of investing in people and infrastructure is an important step to righting […]