Blog

Blog

PPI’s Ben Ritz Talks Social Security with Ric Edelman

The Director of PPI’s Center for Funding America’s Future, Ben Ritz, joined personal-finance advisor Ric Edelman on his nationally syndicated radio show to discuss the challenges facing Social Security, their role in the 2020 election, and PPI's proposal to strengthen the program for future generations. Listen to the interview below and read our full plan…

On the Blog: Good News for Low Income Taxpayers

IRS Free File and VITA programs should be improved not discarded. According to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), 90 percent of taxpayers hire paid tax preparers or utilize tax preparation software to file their taxes. For low-income families the cost of tax preparation can significantly reduce the value of their refunds. A 2016 study by…

A Strong First Year for PPI’s Center for Funding America’s Future

As the Progressive Policy Institute’s Center for Funding America’s Future wraps up its first year, we want to thank everyone who followed and supported our work. Below you’ll find a compilation of our contributions to the public discourse in 2018. Through op-eds, blog posts, media interviews, research reports, engagement with elected officials, and public forums…

Ben Ritz Discusses New PPI Report on Two Radio Interviews

Director of PPI's Center for Funding America's Future, Ben Ritz, participated in two radio interviews this week to discuss his new report, Defunding America's Future: The Squeeze on Public Investment in the United States. The report explains how short-sighted fiscal policy is undermining critical investments in education, infrastructure and scientific research that are integral to the long-term…

New Report: Washington Is Crippling America’s Economic Future

Public investment spending could fall to lowest level in modern history by 2026  WASHINGTON — Young Americans are having their future mortgaged by Washington lawmakers who are slashing critical public investments in future generations while simultaneously burying these generations under a mountain of debt, according to a new report published today by the Center for…

New Projections Make Clear We Can’t Afford the Trump Agenda

Yesterday, the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office published their first long-term budget outlook since the passage of last year’s tax cuts and February’s spending increases. In contrast to April’s budget and economic outlook, which made budget projections only for the next decade, the long-term budget outlook offers budget projections over the next 30 years – and…

Before Expanding Medicare, We Have to Pay for Current Beneficiaries

It’s no secret that the American health care system is far from perfect. The United States spends a higher percentage of our gross domestic product on health care than any other country despite having comparable outcomes. And although the Affordable Care Act successfully reduced the percentage of uninsured Americans by almost half between 2010 and…

Trustees Reports Highlight Challenges Facing Medicare and Social Security

The new reports released yesterday by the trustees for Social Security and Medicare warn that both programs face a growing gap between scheduled benefits and the dedicated revenue sources that finance them. If nothing is done to address the shortfalls in these programs, they will pose a grave threat to both the beneficiaries who depend…

Are Democrats Really the Party of Fiscal Responsibility? (Part 2)

Earlier this week, we published a blog exploring the relationship between budget deficits and unemployment under both Democratic and Republican presidents over the last 40 years. Our analysis found that deficits under Democratic presidents rose and fell with unemployment (which is what should happen when adhering to responsible counter-cyclical fiscal policy), while deficits under Republican…

PPI Analysis of CBO’s 2018 Budget and Economic Outlook

The latest report published yesterday by the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office shows the United States faces a rapidly deteriorating fiscal situation. Beginning in 2020, the federal government will spend over $1 trillion more than it raises in revenue every single year in perpetuity. The government has to borrow money to finance these soaring deficits and…